Sampling procedures in research methodology

We all need to remember that public opinion on a given topic cannot be appropriately measured with one question that is only asked on one poll.

Theory of Sampling The theory of sampling is as follows: Even if a stratified sampling approach does not lead to increased statistical efficiency, such a tactic will not result in less efficiency than would simple random sampling, provided that each stratum is proportional to the group's size in the population.

Systematic sampling involves a random start and then proceeds with the selection of every kth element from then onwards. The results usually must be adjusted to correct for the oversampling.

The analogy of a fruit market can be used when thinking about the population, the sample, and the sampling technique. PPS sampling is commonly used for surveys of businesses, where element size varies greatly and auxiliary information is often available—for instance, a survey attempting to measure the number of guest-nights spent in hotels might use each hotel's number of rooms as an auxiliary variable.

Choosing a sampling method

However, if the treatment is weak, then a larger sample size is necessary to find a significant effect. A few of the most common are described below.

Consequently, stratified sampling would be preferred. Some may say that the population is all mangoes in the Bauchi Road fruit market, but they are really only interested in green mangoes. In most cases, the target population, such as students in JS1, is simply too large for the researcher to plan a quality research study.

5 Simple Random Sampling and Other Sampling Methods

Within this section of the Gallup article, there is also an error: Grounded theory procedures and techniques. Researchers want to gather information about a whole group of people the population. Purposeful and theoretical sampling; merging or clear boundaries?.

Simple random sampling or multi-stage sampling will typically answer this question the best. In other cases, our 'population' may be even less tangible.

Sampling (statistics)

This requires that the researcher first knows the proportion of the group in the entire population and then match that proportion within the sample. The model is then built on this biased sample.

Choosing a sampling method

For instance, an investigation of supermarket staffing could examine checkout line length at various times, or a study on endangered penguins might aim to understand their usage of various hunting grounds over time.

Sometimes what defines a population is obvious. Every element has a known nonzero probability of being sampled and involves random selection at some point.

Types of Purposeful Sampling. These conditions give rise to exclusion biasplacing limits on how much information a sample can provide about the population. This was described in Chapter 11, Identify the Population. Using either the hat-and-draw method or a random number table, randomly select the requisite number of males and do the same for the females.

Therefore, the key question in sampling is How representative is the sample of the target population. This was described in Chapter 11, Identify the Population. Systematically apply the sampling technique to each stage until the unit of analysis has been selected.

Therefore, the researcher would select individuals from which to collect the data. The lancet,It is important to understand that the saturation point may occur prematurely if the researcher has a narrow sampling frame, a skewed analysis of the data, or poor methodology.

In statistics, quality assurance, and survey methodology, sampling is the selection of a subset (a statistical sample) In business and medical research, sampling is widely used for gathering information about a population. There are many methods of sampling when doing research.

This guide can help you choose which method to use. Simple random sampling is the ideal, but researchers seldom have the luxury of time or money to access the whole population, so many compromises often have to be made. In social science research, snowball sampling is a similar technique, where existing study subjects are used to recruit more subjects into the sample.

Some variants of snowball sampling, such as respondent driven sampling, allow calculation of selection probabilities and are probability sampling methods under certain conditions.

5 Simple Random Sampling and Other Sampling Methods

The following Slideshare presentation, Sampling in Quantitative and Qualitative Research – A practical how to, offers an overview of sampling methods for quantitative research and contrasts them with qualitative method for further understanding. There are many methods of sampling when doing research.

This guide can help you choose which method to use. Simple random sampling is the ideal, but researchers seldom have the luxury of time or money to access the whole population, so many compromises often have to be made. Simple random sampling (also referred to as random sampling) is the purest and the most straightforward probability sampling strategy.

It is also the most popular method for choosing a sample among population for a wide range of purposes.

Sampling procedures in research methodology
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Sampling Methods for Quantitative Research - Center for Innovation in Research and Teaching